Environmentally friendly technology from Kenya; cooking foods use fireless cooker

» Posted in Article, Family Story, MicroAid, Newsletter

MicroAid trainees sewing polythene paper on the wall of the basket that will be filled with recycled scraps fabric to conserve cooking heat. This is a fireless cooker

MicroAid trainees sewing polythene paper on the wall of the basket that will be filled with recycled scraps fabric to conserve cooking heat. This is a fireless cooker

This is groundbreaking work in Kenya. A new breakthrough; using a modified reed basket to cook or warm food. The mother-housewife can now have more time to take care of family or work in the garden, without having to spending many hours fetching firewood. This technology also reduces air pollution from firewood smoke.

One group of families who live in Amung’ang’a Village, Murang’a County, a central province of Kenya have now learnt how to make fireless cookers with MicroAid donations. Food warmer baskets are made of papyrus, which grows wild in the area and then covered with polythene. The walls are then filled with recycled scraps of fabric and covered with black cloth.

MicroAid Projects training was carried out with the coordination of Stanley Kinyanjui and his team at COSDEP Kenya. Giving knowledge in a way that is simple and easy to understand is very beneficial to the poor. Four women and one man who were participants of the MicroAid micro-project were very keen to participate as this simple technology was never known to them before .

Alice Wairimu Njuguna, a MicroAid beneficiary said: “I am glad to know how to make a fireless cooker. It is going to be of great help to me since I’ll be preparing enough food before going to work on the farm. I just place my mealy porridge in the basket and it is still warm by the time I come back. Less cooking for me and happier children”.

NOTE: A few points to note about Fireless Cookers (sources: http://practicalaction.org/fireless-cooker):
The “fireless cooker” uses stored heat to cook food over a long period of time. The food is cooked on a traditional stove, before it’s transferred to the fireless cooker. The cooker is well insulated, keeping the heat in the food and allowing it to continue cooking inside. A simple basket, insulated with local resources such as banana leaves or old clothes, can reduce fuel use by 40%, preserving scarce food and saving people hours of precious time

All materials are made of natural and easily accessible materials in the village. So no need to spend money on buying oil or electricity to cook food at home.

Recycled scraps fabric are fixed to the walls of the basket and then covered with polythene paper. The basket is used as a tool for cooking because it can store heat

Recycled scraps fabric are fixed to the walls of the basket and then covered with polythene paper. The basket is used as a tool for cooking because it can store heat

A simple idea; with simple technology that provides tremendous benefits for rural families. Thank you for the generosity of Vanessa, Toby and Katty who have funded this training. Your helping hand is very useful for the low income families of the world who need MicroAid (www.microaid.org).

The MicroAid trainees in Amung'ang'a Village, Kenya after learning how to make fireless cookers for their homes

The MicroAid trainees in Amung’ang’a Village, Kenya after learning how to make fireless cookers for their homes

Share this:
Facebook Twitter Linkedin Email