MicroAid

Life becomes easier through the family vegetable garden

»Posted in Article, Family Story, Maumere, MicroAid, Project Report

Meta, one of Fransiska’s daughters, is wateringkale seeds using a hose pipe purchased from the results of the vegetableharvest of rural cabbages (collard) and broccoli. All are happy because it iseasier to water the plants using a water hose, no need to use the bucket.

We live and manage the family vegetable garden In Wailiti village, Sikka regency, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. It is currently the end of dry season and will coming to rainy season soon so we need a lot of water for watering the plants. We have also just finished planting spinach seeds.

Praise God, from the harvest result of cabbage and broccoli we grew on the same land, and with additional funding we get from MicroAid, then we can buy a new water pump. This allows us to water our plants. We are all happy because it is easier to water the plants using a water hose, no need to use a bucket that we had to take water from far away.

Again and again, we are grateful for the grace of God. All has become much easier now. Easy to water the plants because we use a water hose, easy to care for the garden because the whole family helped and easy sell our harvest because buyers come directly to our gardens to buy the crop.

Fransiska and four other housewives with the help of their children are currently busy taking care of vegetable gardens run by the family. In January 2011, they only manage a vegetable garden area of 100 m2 which planted only cabbages. Because so many were interested in the results of the vegetable garden, now they have added to their garden area up to 400 m2 with kale, collards and broccoli. Thank you MicroAid and the Toby Beresford family, who came to visit us last year.
Read the full project report here

If you want to buy our crops, please visit to our village…

Fransiska and family group,
Wailiti village, Sikka regency, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

 

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New Look Websites at MicroAid

»Posted in Article, MicroAid, Newsletter

Take a sneak preview of our new look as we bring all aspects of MicroAid into one place.

MicroAid Projects
A place to fund poor families directly so they can learn a new home enterprise skill. Helping people help themselves.

MicroAid Library
Our MicroAid library shares experience in video, audio, text and reports on Best Management Practices (BMPs) for interesting products for low income families. Using the same BMPs for their home enterprise, families can join together in clusters with other micro-producers that provide the quality and quantity needed by the market.

MicroAid Connections
Using Linked In and other social networks, we connect the private sector to the bottom of the pyramid in shared value supply chains for sustainable livelihoods products. Connecting directly offers the traceability and corporate social responsibility (CSR) now demanded by new consumers.

Informed People + Quality Product + Market Connection = Sustainable Livelihoods = Poverty Eradication

Warm regards,
MicroAid Projects Team

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Selling embroidery crafts at the Pillayarpatti Temple

»Posted in Article, Family Story, MicroAid, Project Report

I felt a great benefit and satisfied from the MicroAid course. I learned how to make embroidered fabric with attractive designs but using simple techniques. Now 4 months after the training, I have developed my own craft products and have started selling them at my local market. This is a much better opportunity for me to increase my income.

My name is Jamuna from Pillayarpatti village, Tamil Nadu, India. Initially I was a housewife. At that time, the economic situation of my family was in big trouble. To increase my family income, I was working in some embroidery shops in my village and got a little income.

Jamuna sells her embroidery crafts at the Pillayarpatti temple

I attended a short training course to make embroidery offered by Ford Trust in Pillayarpatti. Then I followed the MicroAid Projects training to expand my embroidery techniques in making embroidery. I had training in making embroidered fabric for toys and dolls. (See MicroAid-project report FTIN9082). I felt a great benefit and satisfied from the MicroAid course. I learned how to make embroidered fabric with attractive designs but using simple techniques.

Now 4 months after the training, I have developed my own craft products and have started selling them at my local market. This is a much better opportunity for me to increase my income. Now I earn more per day than I used to earn working as a labourer at the embroidery factory. Per day on average I can get US $1.63 – $2.04 from the sale of my crafts. Sometimes just getting $1.02 when not much visitor and could reach $5 if in holiday and many visitors who come to the temple. Now I sell my embroidery crafts at the famous temple in Pillayarpatti village where many people come to pray. I would like to say a big thank you to Ford Trust and MicroAid for my skills training.

Now I have a good future.

Warm regards,
Jamuna

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Skilled mother, happy family

»Posted in Article, Family Story, Maumere, MicroAid

Since early June 2011, they’ve harvested cabbages 3 times with an average of about 2,000 cabbages sold every harvest. Even today Fransiska no longer needs to carry vegetables to market in the district, but it is now the buyers that come to the village and immediately buy up all the vegetables as soon as they are harvested.

Fransiska (right rear) and her husband Thomas (right front) and their children. Fransiska can now educate her
children by selling vegetables from the cabbage garden behind her house

It is the obligation of every parent to provide education for their children. But what if the family is poor and whose life and livelihood have been hit by illness and deprived of the resources, many of us take for granted? Empowering the family is one of the key strategies MicroAid projects uses to eradicate poverty. Empowered families can pay for food and education for their children on their own.

The photo above is Thomas and family with four children live in Waility village, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia.

Since 1986 Thomas was paralyzed, his legs cannot be used for walking. Thomas’s day-to-day job before he became disabled was as a fisherman. Many men in Waility village are fishermen. They look for fish in the sea and sell their catch in local markets. As a result of the illness that disabled him, Thomas can no longer work as fisherman.

There is no a worker insurance or social services in Waility village. So the livelihood to meet the needs of his family life stopped abruptly and there was no help around for a family of six. There was not enough food on the table and the children could not go to school.

Until now, Thomas does not know what causes his paralysis. Medical services are also scarce in this part of the world. One day when he woke up in the morning, he could not move his legs. His family and friends brought Thomas to the doctors and local hospital but until now the disease is not curable. In 1994, Thomas was married to Fransiska. From their marriage, Thomas has been blessed with 5 children. But one of his children died as an infant, so now there are 4 children who they are responsible for.

To support his family, Thomas worked as farm labourer in his neighbour’s vegetable garden. He carried out all his work activities crawling, because his legs could not be used. Fransiska, his wife, helped to meet the needs of their family by working as a housemaid cleaning, washing public facilities and any chore to earn money to feed the family.

Through the training for village nurseries that was funded by donors of MicroAid Projects in 2010, Fransiska has become the inspiration for mothers in Waility village to manage a cabbage vegetable garden. In early 2011, Fransiska, Thomas’s wife took over her husband’s role as the family breadwinner. Fransiska along with 6 other women, neighbours, manage together a vegetable garden that is just at the back of their house. Initially Fransiska was a housewife who filled her time caring for her family, just like most other mothers in the village.

Photo caption: Now the buyers that come to the village and immediately buy up all the vegetables as soon as they
are harvested

Since early June 2011, they’ve harvested cabbages 3 times with an average of about 2,000 cabbages sold every harvest. Even today Fransiska no longer needs to carry vegetables to market in the district, but it is now the buyers that come to the village and immediately buy up all the vegetables as soon as they are harvested.

Each harvest, Fransiska earns about £43. With this income every month, Fransiska can send their four children to the public schools in her village and buy textbooks. But the necessities of life are not only that. There are still many other things needed to further enhance the welfare of families like Fransiska.

MicroAid Projects with a method of learning business skills as an approach to empower the poor family, invites you all to give a big opportunity for groups of poor families in Indonesia, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Kenya and Uganda to learn new skills that can be used to improve the welfare families so that they can educate their children independently and sustainably.

Today, Thomas and four of his children help Fransiska after school in the watering and clearing the family’s garden with pride. They are very grateful to MicroAid donors who have given them the opportunity to learn new skills and how to make money from a vegetable garden so that they can find a way to eradicate their poverty themselves.

A little help for a better future for one poor family – MicroAid.

Thank you MicroAid donors
from
Thomas and Fransiska

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Your Zakat is more than just for eating

»Posted in Article, Family Story, MicroAid

A mother was sewing at home to fulfill customer orders
Assalammualikum Wr. Wb.
Happy Ramadan. May your fasting be accepted by Allah SWT and provide good benefits for all.
Start from this year 2011 (1432 Hijriyah), MicroAid Projects Charity and I would like to help distribute alms from anyone who wants to give Zakat to groups of poor families in Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Kenya and Uganda.
Zakat that you provide will be directly channeled to groups of families who want to learn new home enterprise skills. New skills such as: making banana crisps, sewing for profit, vegetable gardening and others.
Why do we need to help?
The home enterprise skills will enable beneficiaries to open new business opportunities in small groups / families. Having the ability to start a home enterprise, they can live independently and not depend on help from others for the rest of their lives. The Zakat you provide is not simply just to feed them one day, but for the increase in welfare of the whole family.  This the real meaning of “growth” in Zakat.
Help another family to become self-reliant.  This is the main purpose of Zakat that you provide via Microaid Projects Charity. You can read the stories of families who have managed to live independently here.
Thank you very much.
Walaikumsalam Wr. Wb.
Jalu Wardhana, Team Leader
About Zakat:
Zakat is one of the five Pillars of Islam.  Each year, Muslims give away a fixed percentage (generally 2.5%) of their wealth to benefit the poor and deprived.  It is considered an act of worship and purifying, for both the giver and the recipient.
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