Article

A new light from discarded plastic bottles

»Posted in Article, Family Story

See how a simple technology can help lives of low income families. 
Not a MicroAid project but a great idea!
Do you have a creative idea like this that we can share with others?
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Life becomes easier through the family vegetable garden

»Posted in Article, Family Story, Maumere, MicroAid, Project Report

Meta, one of Fransiska’s daughters, is wateringkale seeds using a hose pipe purchased from the results of the vegetableharvest of rural cabbages (collard) and broccoli. All are happy because it iseasier to water the plants using a water hose, no need to use the bucket.

We live and manage the family vegetable garden In Wailiti village, Sikka regency, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. It is currently the end of dry season and will coming to rainy season soon so we need a lot of water for watering the plants. We have also just finished planting spinach seeds.

Praise God, from the harvest result of cabbage and broccoli we grew on the same land, and with additional funding we get from MicroAid, then we can buy a new water pump. This allows us to water our plants. We are all happy because it is easier to water the plants using a water hose, no need to use a bucket that we had to take water from far away.

Again and again, we are grateful for the grace of God. All has become much easier now. Easy to water the plants because we use a water hose, easy to care for the garden because the whole family helped and easy sell our harvest because buyers come directly to our gardens to buy the crop.

Fransiska and four other housewives with the help of their children are currently busy taking care of vegetable gardens run by the family. In January 2011, they only manage a vegetable garden area of 100 m2 which planted only cabbages. Because so many were interested in the results of the vegetable garden, now they have added to their garden area up to 400 m2 with kale, collards and broccoli. Thank you MicroAid and the Toby Beresford family, who came to visit us last year.
Read the full project report here

If you want to buy our crops, please visit to our village…

Fransiska and family group,
Wailiti village, Sikka regency, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

 

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New Look Websites at MicroAid

»Posted in Article, MicroAid, Newsletter

Take a sneak preview of our new look as we bring all aspects of MicroAid into one place.

MicroAid Projects
A place to fund poor families directly so they can learn a new home enterprise skill. Helping people help themselves.

MicroAid Library
Our MicroAid library shares experience in video, audio, text and reports on Best Management Practices (BMPs) for interesting products for low income families. Using the same BMPs for their home enterprise, families can join together in clusters with other micro-producers that provide the quality and quantity needed by the market.

MicroAid Connections
Using Linked In and other social networks, we connect the private sector to the bottom of the pyramid in shared value supply chains for sustainable livelihoods products. Connecting directly offers the traceability and corporate social responsibility (CSR) now demanded by new consumers.

Informed People + Quality Product + Market Connection = Sustainable Livelihoods = Poverty Eradication

Warm regards,
MicroAid Projects Team

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My first sewing stall

»Posted in Article, Family Story, Maumere, Project Report

I glad I can get additional income for my family and could use my time for activities that make money. I am grateful to be starting up a small business. I acquired these skills during the two days of MicroAid Projects training which I attended with my friends Maliana, Paulina, Agustina and Mely.

My name is Marselina, I live with my two children who are still in school in the Public Elementary Schools in Magepanda village, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. Since August 2011 I have started receiving orders to sew women clothes and tablecloths.

I was sewing a tablecloth. Meliana (my friend who lent her sewing tools) is being guided me

I am grateful to be starting up a small business. I acquired these skills during the two days of MicroAid Projects training which I attended with my friends Meliana, Paulina, Agustina and Mely. The training that we followed on June 2011 was Sewing Practical. In the training we learned how to sew and use embroidery machine.

One week after training, we held a bazaar in front of the Church where we worship together every Sunday. In the bazaar we sold out all of our results of our training, such as tablecloths, flags and pastries made by other groups. For my group, we made US $34 from the sale of 6 tablecloths. Then we put the money into a savings group to help buy more materials using micro-credit loans to our members.

I initiated borrowing money $11 from the group as my sewing business capital. I bought yarns and sewing equipment such as needles, scissors, measuring instruments and others. I will return the loan to be repaid over 4 months plus interest of 1%. While sewing tools (not machine) I borrowed from my friend Marselina, whose kind mother lends me her tools every Saturday and Sunday.

I (red t-shirt) and my friends are following the sewing training

On average every month I received 10 orders from neighbors in the village to sew tablecloths. One tablecloth I sell at a price of $6 with net profit of about $3. So in one month I can earn approximately $30. This money is pretty huge for me because previously I did not make any money myself. My husband is a motorcycle taxi driver in the village.

I glad I can get additional income for my family and could use my time for activities that make money. Thanks to MicroAid Projects donors who gave the chance for me and my friends to do the training and become business women with the first sewing stall in our village.

Loving greetings, Marselina

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Selling embroidery crafts at the Pillayarpatti Temple

»Posted in Article, Family Story, MicroAid, Project Report

I felt a great benefit and satisfied from the MicroAid course. I learned how to make embroidered fabric with attractive designs but using simple techniques. Now 4 months after the training, I have developed my own craft products and have started selling them at my local market. This is a much better opportunity for me to increase my income.

My name is Jamuna from Pillayarpatti village, Tamil Nadu, India. Initially I was a housewife. At that time, the economic situation of my family was in big trouble. To increase my family income, I was working in some embroidery shops in my village and got a little income.

Jamuna sells her embroidery crafts at the Pillayarpatti temple

I attended a short training course to make embroidery offered by Ford Trust in Pillayarpatti. Then I followed the MicroAid Projects training to expand my embroidery techniques in making embroidery. I had training in making embroidered fabric for toys and dolls. (See MicroAid-project report FTIN9082). I felt a great benefit and satisfied from the MicroAid course. I learned how to make embroidered fabric with attractive designs but using simple techniques.

Now 4 months after the training, I have developed my own craft products and have started selling them at my local market. This is a much better opportunity for me to increase my income. Now I earn more per day than I used to earn working as a labourer at the embroidery factory. Per day on average I can get US $1.63 – $2.04 from the sale of my crafts. Sometimes just getting $1.02 when not much visitor and could reach $5 if in holiday and many visitors who come to the temple. Now I sell my embroidery crafts at the famous temple in Pillayarpatti village where many people come to pray. I would like to say a big thank you to Ford Trust and MicroAid for my skills training.

Now I have a good future.

Warm regards,
Jamuna

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